Volunteering: Your Single New Years Resolution 

Published in RINewstoday on January 10, 2023

As the ball dropped in New York’s Time Square, many Americans have already penned New Year’s resolutions for 2023.  Making these resolutions as January approaches has become a very common tradition for millions.

According to the Statista 2022 Consumer Survey (413 adults ages 18 to 89 years old surveyed from Oct. 25 to Nov. 2, 2022) living a healthier life style by going to the gym, eating nutritious meals and even losing weight were the top three New Year’s resolutions for 2023.

While resolutions provide us with a road map as to how we can make improvements in our lives, many can’t overcome obstacles to keep them. An Inc. web article, written by Marcel Schwantes, noted only 9 percent will be successful in achieving their goals.

Just “Pick One” – Resolution

Second Harvest Heartland, one of the nation’s largest hunger relief organizations, calls on people to just put one resolution, “becoming a volunteer” on their list. “Picking a cause and getting out to volunteer turns out to be the one single, achievable, sustainable and widely beneficial resolution for New Year,” says the Minnesota-based company.

That’s a great suggestion.

According to Project Helping, research tells us that “volunteering helps improve mood, makes you feel healthier, increases your sense of purpose, and reduces your stress levels. Volunteering can also give us a deep sense of happiness both immediately and long-term,” the research studies say.

“Our volunteers give their time to help others, and rarely ever think about how it can impact their own lives in so many ways,” said Julie Greene, director of volunteer engagement at Second Harvest Heartland. “Of course, they feel a tremendous sense of satisfaction knowing their contributions are making a difference in people’s lives, but the benefits of their actions go way beyond that. 

Given the camaraderie people feel by coming together and the satisfaction of working on a common goal, I’m not surprised at all that research has proven the benefits of volunteering—we see it every day with the smiles on our volunteers’ faces,” says Greene.

“Volunteering is Medicine for the Soul”

Being a volunteer can also be a protective buffer from the curve balls that life may throw at us as we age. “Volunteering can be medicine for the soul. It allows you to connect with other people, explore and remedy emerging community issues, make a difference as a caregiver or mentor and change lives.

Volunteering is powerful and can define and redirect your life’s journey,” says Vincent Marzullo, who for 31 years served as RI’s National Service Director and still volunteers weekly at Hasbro Children’s Hospital.

Adds, James Connell, Executive Director, of Age-Friendly Rhode Island:  “There’s no better way to reduce tension, combat social isolation, and feel tremendous self-satisfaction than by connecting with others and giving back to the community and your neighbors by volunteering.”

Connell says Rhode Islanders as a population are aging, nearly one in three of us will become age 65 and over by the end of the decade. “Volunteers and volunteerism will be key factors in creating a great state in which to age. Older adults want to stay active, engaged, and remain in their homes; as a volunteer or by being the recipient of volunteers services we can achieve this and so much more,” he says.

“Aging Rhode Islanders need you,” says Connell.  “Volunteer to provide supports to stay at home, to connect and provide company to combat social isolation, and to positively impact their overall health and well-being trough connection and service,” he adds.

A sampling of Rhode Island volunteer opportunities

For volunteer opportunities, Connell calls on seniors to contact Retired Senior and Volunteer Program (RSVP), the nation’s largest volunteer network for those age 55 and over.  RSVP volunteers serve the community at non-profits, community programs, and service agencies. Volunteers mentor school children, prepare tax returns, knit caps for newborns, participate in volunteer transportation networks, and visit homebound Rhode Islanders, he says.

Why not  contact a Community Action Program (CAP) in your region to find out more about volunteer opportunities, suggests Connell, noting that they are located in East Bay (EBCAP), West Bay CAP, East Bay (EBCAP) and at Federal Hill House Providence.

Or you can contact the Diocese of Providence, or other faith communities, to learn more about volunteer opportunities. 

The Neighborhood Friendly Visitor Program, a community-based volunteer program, provides weekly visitors to isolated elderly and disabled adults in Rhode Island, seeks older volunteers, says Connell. “The program was developed in 1978 by Sister Rhea Lachapelle of the Sisters of Saint Ann to address the needs of a growing and diverse population of seniors living alone with little or no social support. Any senior age 60 and over, or disabled person who is homebound, residents of any nursing home or assisted living, or patients at hospitals, is eligible for this program. There are no income guidelines and there is no fee for this service,” adds. Connell.

Connell says that Friendly Visitor volunteers are available state-wide. Volunteers have supplied personnel references and passed a background check through the Office of the Attorney General. The program has on-going recruitment of volunteers who make a commitment to visit or call seniors for at least one hour each week. This program is funded in Partnership with the Rhode Island Office of Healthy Aging, he says.

The Senior Companion Program, sponsored by the Rhode Island Office of Healthy Aging (RIOHA) and the federally funded by the Corporation for National & Community Service, also seeks volunteers, says Connell. “Senior companions are over the age of 55 and provide companionship and reassurance with seniors and adults with special needs, he says, noting that these companions visit, and listen.

To request a Senior Companion or to apply to be a Senior Companion contact RIOHA at 401-462.0569.  

Connell also directs seniors to investigate volunteer opportunities at The Village Common of Rhode Island (TVC). The nonprofit, volunteer-driven membership organization supports seniors who wish to age in their home via a network of local villages – communities of mutual support – in Rhode Island.

“We currently have villages in Barrington, Edgewood, Providence and Westerly. Our volunteers assist members in a myriad of ways, from driving to medical appointments and running errands, to doing household chores and minor repairs, to providing technology support for TVs, phones and computers, to making friendly calls and visits,” says Connell, noting that TVC and its local villages host an array of social and educational events for our members and volunteers (live, and via zoom).

Finally, Connell also notes that local Senior Centers, Child and Family Rhode Island, located in Newport and Providence, Meals on Wheels, the Rhode Island Food Bank (or local food banks in every city and town, can be a great source for volunteering, too. 

For details about the benefits of becoming a volunteer, go to 

https://projecthelping.org/benefits-of-volunteering/.

To learn about volunteer opportunities, go to:

A listing of senior volunteer activities, Office of Healthy Aging, go to https://oha.ri.gov/get-involved/volunteer/

AARP Rhode Island, go to https://states.aarp.org/rhode-island/volunteering-aarp-rhode-island

Rhode Island Food Bank, go to https://rifoodbank.org/get-involved/volunteer-in-the-community/ or 

Local food bankshttps://dhs.ri.gov/sites/g/files/xkgbur426/files/Documents-Forms/FoodAssistanceProviderListFAL-October-16-2020.pdf

Children@FamilyRI, go to https://childandfamilyri.com/

Rhode Island Community Action Programs, go to  https://www.ricommunityaction.org/find-your-community-action-agency/

Rhode Island Senior and Volunteer Program, go to https://americorps.gov/serve/americorps-seniors

United Way of Rhode Island, go to https://volunteer.uwri.org/

RI Elder Info, Advocacy Agencies, go to https://rielderinfo.com/advocacy-assistance/

Diocese of Providence, go to https://dioceseofprovidence.org/elder-services

To the Class of 2022: Age boldly, enjoy your journey

Published in RINewsToday on May 16, 2022

According to Research.com, this year commencement speakers at colleges and universities in Rhode Island will impart their “pearls of wisdom“ to 19,782 graduating college seniors and their families. The usual commencement speech, traditionally about 10 minutes in length, offers simple tips and observations that, if taken, just might offer the young graduates a more rewarding personal and professional life ahead. Social media platforms and websites will quickly disseminate this sage advice given by well-known lawmakers, judges, television personalities and CEOs, to millions across the globe.

Globe columnist Dan McGowan gives his readers in the Rhode Map, the paper’s free newsletter about Rhode Island, a who’s who list of well-known commencement speakers that will gather at Rhode Island’s 12 Colleges and Universities to give the Class of 2022 advice on making their new journey in the world amidst the continuing COVID-19 pandemic causing sweeping societal changes in the workplace, health care, and social activity. 

McGowan’s detailed listing of “marquee names” delivering commencement speeches at Rhode Island’s colleagues and universities are:  

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at Brown University; Emmy Award-winning actor and director Henry Winkler at  New England Institute of Technology; Human Resource Guru William J. Conaty at Bryant College; Rhode Island Governor Dan McKee at CCRI; Big East Commissioner Val Ackerman at Providence College;  Entrepreneur and Author Bruce Poon Tip, Founder of G Adventures; Miriam Hospital President Maria Ducharme at Rhode Island College, Deep Sea Explorer Robert Ballard noted for his work in undersea archeology at URI; Graphic designer, educator and Author Cheryl D. Miller at RISD; Navyn Salem, who founded the nonprofit Edesia, Inc. whose mission is to treat and prevent global malnutrition at Salve Regina; and Dr. Anthony Fauci, Chief Medical adviser to the president at Roger Williams University.

This year’s commencement speakers are very well-deserving of their honor to address Rhode Island’s graduating college seniors.  But if I had an opportunity to speak before the graduating class of 2022, here are my thoughts and tips I would give, centered on the importance of aging gracefully and boldly over your accumulating years, and they will accumulate faster than anyone could imagine.

Aging can be viewed as a life-long, unpredictable journey.  A slang phrase in Wikipedia sums up “a simple existential observation that life is full of unpredictable events. Over the years, you might have heard the phrase, “Shit Happens.” Many people choose to hold on to their fading youth, not wanting to look in the mirror to see wrinkles, sagging stomachs, and even gray hair.  They hold fiercely to their memories of the 1963 Pepsi Generation commercial that celebrated youth and active people.   

It’s so easy to say, accept and embrace your aging.  

You will be tempted to chase after prestige, power, the perfect relationship, or a high paying job.  I say being healthy is your most important possession you can have in your lifetime. Cherish it. Work towards it. URI Gerontologist Phil Clark once told me, “Use it or lose it. Stay as physically active as you can.”  “If you rest, you rust,” he says, noting that physical exercise elevates our mood and benefits our cardiovascular system, too. This conversation took place over 25 years ago, and I still remember this advice.  

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, a North Attleboro couple, Mark and Nancy Shorrock began dining daily, seven days a week, if their schedules permitted, at Spumoni’s Restaurant in Pawtucket.  Over the years, they developed personal relationships with around 30 couples who frequented the informal restaurant and bar. While not a support system, that informal group who knew each other innately, benefited the Shorrocks, and I would think all of the people who kept coming back as regularly as they did. 

The importance of being around others is documented in a 2017 national report. The Global Council on Brain Health (GCBH) report, released by AARP, cites strong scientific evidence that behavior changes and lifestyle habits can positively impact one’s brain health. It’s not uncommon for social networks to shrink as we age. “Research tells us that larger social networks may positively impact your health, well-being, even your cognitive functioning,” said Sarah Lock, AARP Senior vice president for Policy and GCBH Executive Director. 

So, as the decades fly by, work to maintain your social network of family and friends to maintain good cognitive functioning. And while you may build your on-line networks, do not overlook the greater importance of the in-person kind, those you break bread with, share what your children may be doing, or call just to hear a voice who knows a whole lot about you, without your even having to say it.      

Research also tells us that you can also reduce your risk of cognitive decline by exercising your brain. Take time in your busy day to read newspapers, magazines, and books, or even play a challenging crossword puzzle, build your vocabulary, learn a new skill, even play chess.

Being a volunteer can also be a protective buffer from the curve balls that life may throw at us as we age. “Volunteering can be medicine for the soul. It allows you to connect with other people, explore and remedy emerging community issues, make a difference as a caregiver or mentor and change lives. Volunteering is powerful and can define and redirect your life’s journey,” says Vincent Marzullo, who for 31 years served as RI’s National Service Director and still volunteers weekly at Hasbro Children’s Hospital.

When you require help, don’t be afraid to ask your family, friends or even professional colleagues for support and assistance. People will always go up the ladder of their careers, even down, too.  Take the opportunity to be there for not only people you know, but also strangers when they need a helping hand to jump-start their faltering personal relationships or professional careers. 

Time really does fly after you graduate college.  Don’t be afraid to pivot in your career – you may have spent 4 years or 8 years or many more studying and becoming an expert in a particular subject, but find your passion calls you to another career-path. Don’t be afraid to take the path that calls out the loudest for you. As you move into your middle or later years, view your life as a meaningful journey, living in the present, not tied to past experiences, nor possible future events. It’s the journey, not the end result, that you should focus on.

Amma, a well-known Hindu spiritual teacher, tells her millions of followers to view their life as a ‘canceled check.’ Let go of those past regrets, forgive yourself for those mistakes especially made in childhood and teenage years, more important those you made as you move into your middle or later years. Don’t regret passing up personal or professional opportunities, for others will follow, she says. Use your time on earth wisely; don’t waste it carrying the burdens of past guilt or personal grudges. Think about that.

View your life as being back in high school, learning from each positive and negative experience you encounter. When you confront life’s health, financial, and personal and professional challenges, keep a positive attitude. Don’t be overwhelmed by negative thoughts. Each day you will make daily choices as to how you will react to your problems. In these situations, you can either see the proverbial glass as either being “half-full” or “half-empty.” A positive attitude allows you to see a “half-full” glass, thus allowing you to successfully overcome the adversity.

As we grow older, we sometimes put too much energy into reflecting on our personal and professional defeats, being depressed on the “bad hands” we were dealt. Savor your victories, but always forgive yourself for your shortcomings and failures. Learning from your shortcomings and defeats will build a strong bridge to future successes.

Also, forgive others who have hurt you personally and professionally. You cannot live or reconcile your life peacefully if you are still holding onto grudges, anger, and bitterness, all tied to past relationships or negative employment experiences.

Writer Simon Kent tells us a powerful story about forgiveness in an article penned in 2013 on the Toronto Sun’s website. When Nelson Mandela’s National African party won the election that would end apartheid in South Africa, he forgave his white political foes, says Kent, noting that the power of forgiveness kept the black majority ruling party from seeking revenge.

According to Kent, at his 1994 inauguration, Prisoner 46664 — Nelson Mandela — had kept a seat set aside for a very special guest he wanted to witness his swearing-in as President, the highest office in the land. This person, one of his former jailers from Robben Island, where he was held for 18 years of hard labor. 

Why do we continue to hold anger, bitterness, and grudges against others? If Mandela can easily forgive his former jailor and a white society that kept his black brothers and sisters enslaved for centuries, why can’t you forgive others, too? 

Pass on your hard-earned wisdom. As you begin to accumulate more of life’s professional and personal experiences, share your story with others, especially those younger than you. By the time you reach your twilight years, you will have accumulated a huge reservoir of untapped wisdom gained from your life’s journey from making both good and bad decisions.  When taking on the new role of parent or grandparent, always continue to share your insights and lessons you have learned to your children and grandchildren.  The generations following you will lose out if you remain silent and keep your knowledge and history from them.

Get off the treadmill of life. Learn to slow down and enjoy the simple moments of your life. In her books and lectures, nationally-acclaimed author Connie Goldman, has stated that the simple act of watching a beautiful sunrise or sunset or even puttering around your garden can be as stimulating as a jam-packed calendar of activities.  

My final thought – nothing is guaranteed in life except death, taxes, and even, hopefully, growing old. So, Class of 2022, I urge you to make the most of your life that is just beginning to unfold before you. Don’t focus on the end result. Focus on the journey. Sometimes it is not the big things that you do that count, rather the simple daily acts of loving kindness you give to all those around you.  

Enjoy your new journey. Age boldly.