Courtesy of AARP: Long-Term Care Data at Your Finger Tips

Published in the Woonsocket Call on September 2, 2018

Across the States 2018: Profiles of Long-Term Services and Supports, by Ari Houser, Wendy Fox-Grage, Kathleen Ujvari, of AARP’s Public Policy Institute, was released days ago. The jampacked 84-page AARP reference report gives state and federal policy makers comparable state-level and national data culled from a large number of research studies and data sources, some of the data gleaned from original sources.

AARP considers the 10th edition of Across the States, published for the past 24 years, “the flagship publication” to assist policy makers make informed decisions as they create programs, and policies for long-term services and supports (LTSS). State-specific data “is easily found, “at your fingertips,” claims AARP.

Across the States, released August 27, 2018, includes a myriad of aging topics include: age demographics and projections; living arrangements, income, and poverty; disability rates; costs of care; private long-term care insurance; Medicaid long-term services and supports; family caregivers; home- and community-based services (HCBS); and nursing facilities. Each state profile is a four-page, user-friendly, print-ready document that provides each state’s data and rankings.

Looking at Trends

AARP Public Policy Institute researchers have identified four trends in reviewing state data. Of most importance to Congress and state legislatures, Across the States gives a warning that America’s population is aging. The nation’s age 85 and over population, those most in need of aging programs and services, is projected to triple between 2015 and 2050, a whopping 208 percent increase.

But, by comparison, the population younger than age 65 is expected to increase by only 12 percent. The under age 65 population, currently, 85 percent of the total population, is projected to be 78 percent in 2050. Bad news for propping up the Social Security system with the worker-to – beneficiary ratio declining.

Across the States researchers say that the demographic shift of an increasing older population will have an impact on family caregiving. “The caregiver support ratio compares the number of people ages 45–64 (peak caregiver age) to the number ages 80+ (peak care need),” notes the report. Today, there are about 7 people ages 45–64 for every person age 80. By 2050, that ratio will drop to 3 to 1.

America’s older population is also becoming more diverse, reflecting overall trends in the general population. Across the States researchers note that the Hispanic population age 65 and over is projected to quadruple between 2015 and 2050.

Finally, Across the States report notes that State Medicaid LTSS systems are becoming more balanced due to the increase of state dollars going to fund home and community-based services (specifically to care for older people and adults with disabilities). But, this trend varies in level of balance, say the researchers, noting that: “The percentage of LTSS spending for older people and adults with disabilities going to HCBS ranged from 13 percent to 73 percent in 2016. While 40 states became more balanced, 11 states became less balanced for older adults and people with physical disabilities in 2016 compared with 2011.”

Taking a Closer Look

Across the States notes that the age 85 and over population is projected to significantly outpace all other age groups when the aging baby boomers begin turning age 85 in 2031. In 2015, people ages 85 and older made up 2 percent of the US population. By 2050, they are projected to represent 5 percent. By contrast, in the Ocean State the age 85 and over population was 2.7 percent of the state’s population. By 2050, look for the oldest-old population to inch up to 5.4 percent.

Throughout the nation the cost for private pay nursing facility care is well out of reach of most middle-income families. Across the States notes that in 2017 the annual median cost for nursing facilities is $97,455 for a private room and $87,600 for a shared room. But, in Rhode Island the annual cost is higher, with a private room costing $ 104,025 and $ 101,835 for a shared room. The researchers say that for the cost of residing in a nursing facility for one year, a person could pay for three years of home care or five years of adult day services.

Because of the high costs, most people go through their life savings paying for costly care and ultimately have to rely on the state’s Medicaid program. Nationally, the percent of Medicaid as primary payer in 2016 was 62 percent (61 percent in Rhode Island).

According to Across the States, family caregivers provided $470 billion worth of unpaid care in 2013, more than six times the Medicaid spending on home and community-based services. In Rhode Island, 134,000 provided 124 million hours of care annually with an economic value $ 1.78 billion. But, AARP’s report warns federal and state policy makers about the stark demographics in America’s future that will for the nation’s “Oldest Old” to scramble to find a caregiver, due to a shortage. Will state’s have the financial resources to fund programs and services to make up for this demographic reality.

For a copy of Across the States report and Rhode Island specifics, go to: http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/ppi/2018/08/across-the-states-profiles-of-long-term-services-and-supports-full-report.pdf.

Survey: Older Americans Puzzled About LTC Programs and Services

Published in Woonsocket Call on July 19, 2015

Planning for your golden years is key to aging gracefully.  But, according to a new national survey looking at experiences and attitudes, most Aging Boomers and seniors do not feel prepared for planning or financing their long-term care for themselves or even their loved ones.

This Associated Press (AP)-NORC (NORC) Center for Public Affairs Research study, funded by The SCAN Foundation, explores a myriad of aging issues, including person-centered care experiences and the special challenges faced by the sandwich generation.  These middle-aged adults juggle their time and stretching their dollars by providing care to their parents, even grandparents while also financially assisting their adult children and grandchildren.

Older American’s Understanding of LTC

This 21 page survey report, released on July 9th, is the third in an annual series of studies of Americans age 40 and older, examines older Americans understanding of long-term care, their perceptions and misperceptions regarding the cost and likelihood of requiring long-term care services, and their attitudes and behaviors regarding planning for possible future care needs.

The survey’s findings say that 12 percent of Americans age 40 to 54 provide both financial support for their children and ongoing living assistance to other loved ones.   Federal programs are often times confusing to these individuals, too.   More than 25 percent are unsure whether Medicare pays for ongoing living assistance services like nursing homes and home health aides. About 1 in 4 older Americans also overestimate private health insurance coverage of nursing home care.

Researchers noted that about half of the respondents believe that a family member or close friend will need ongoing living assistance within the next five years. Of those who anticipate this need, 7 out of 10 reports they do not feel very prepared to provide care, they note.

More than three-quarters of those surveyed age 40 or older who are either receiving or providing ongoing living assistance indicate that their care includes at least one component of “person-centered care.”  This approach allows individuals to take control of their own care by specifying preferences and outlining goals that will approve their quality of life.

The survey also finds that most of those reporting believe that features of “person-centered care” have improved the quality of care

Paying for Costly LTC Services

The 2015 survey findings are consistent with AP-NORC survey findings from previous years, that is older Americans continue to lack confidence in their ability to pay the costs of ongoing living assistance.  Medium annual costs for nursing homes are $91,260; the cost for at-home health is about half that amount, $45,760, says the report.

Finally, only a third of the survey respondents say that they have set aside money for their care. More than half report doing little or no planning at all for their own ongoing living assistance needs in their later years.

“The three surveys on long-term care [by AP-NORC] are helping us create a comprehensive picture of what Americans 40 and older understand about the potential need for these critically important services,” said Director Trevor Tompson, at the AP-NORC Center in a statement. “Experts estimate that 7 in 10 Americans who reach the age of 65 will need some form of long-term care, and our findings show that many Americans are unprepared for this reality,” he says.

Dr. Bruce Chernof, President and CEO of The SCAN Foundation, says that the 2015 study takes a look at public perception regarding long-term care and most importantly, how people can plan for future long-term care needs.  “The insight provided by this research is critical because it will help us promote affordable health care and support for daily living, which are essential to aging with dignity and independence.” he says.

AP-NORC’s 2015 study results are validated by other national research studies, says AARP Rhode Island State Director Kathleen Connell.    “AARP’s research, both nationally and state by state, reveals that people in the 50+ population are concerned about the cost of retirement and especially long-term care,” she says, observing that “very few people seem worry free on this question and rightfully so.”

 Beginning the Planning Process

Connell adds, “I would say our response to this survey is that it adds to the awareness that people need to start thinking about this at an earlier age. And that means not only focusing on saving but also getting serious about health and fitness.”

What can a person do to better prepare for paying for costly long-term care and community based services?   “AARP.org has an abundance of information on long-term care. There’s advice on long-term care insurance, a long-term care cost calculator and many other resources. We also need to remain strong as advocates for programs that support seniors. Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid need to remain strong in order to support Americans entering the most vulnerable chapters of their lives,” she says.

Amy Mendoza, spokesperson for the American Health Care Association (AHCA), a Washington, DC-based trade association that represents over 12,000 non-profit and proprietary skilled nursing centers, assisted living communities, sub-acute centers and homes for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities, calls for increased conversations to help planning for potential future need.  “Given that the need for long-term or post-acute care is a life changing event, it demands some considerable thought, discussion and research,” says Mendoza.

“AHCA’s “Care Conversations” program helps individuals have the honest and productive discussions needed to plan and prepare for the future long-term care needs,” adds Mendoza.  Care Conversations has a Planning Tools page on its website which provides information on advance directives. Learn more at: http://careconversations.org/planning-tools.

Todd Whatley, a certified elder law attorney, notes that some of his best clients are middle age adults who after taking care of their parents want to avoid costly nursing home or community based care services.  “They are then suddenly very interested in some type of [insurance] coverage for the extraordinary expense of long term care when a year earlier, they had no interest whatsoever,” he says.

Whatley, President-Elect of the Tuscan, Arizona-based National Elder Law Foundation, suggests contacting a financial planner or Certified Elder Law Attorney when purchasing long term care insurance, “Get early advice from someone with their best interest at heart.  There are many times that a person simply doesn’t need this product financially, but most people do.

To locate a Certified Elder Law Attorney, contact Lori Barbee, Executive Director, National Elder Law Foundation.  She can be reached at 520-881-1076 or by email: Lori@nelf.org.

For a copy of the study, go to http://www.longtermcarepoll.org/Pages/Polls/long-term-care-2015.aspx.

Herb Weiss, LRI ’12 is a Pawtucket-based writer covering aging, health care and medical issues.  He can be reached at hweissri@aol.com.

 

 

Rethinking Rhode Island’s LTC Delivery System

Published in the Woonsocket Call on April 12, 2015

AARP Rhode Island releases a state-specific analysis, of the 2014 edition of “Raising Expectations: A State Scorecard on Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) for Older Adults, People with Physical Disabilities, and Family Caregivers” that just might give state officials cause for concern, a low rating on its long-term care delivery system, when compared to other states.

The 2011 Scorecard was the first multidimensional assessment of state performance of LTSS. Like this earlier version, the release of the 109 page 2014 report, referred to as the LTSS Scorecard, and its state-specific analysis (prepared by policy consultant Maureen Maigret), measuring how well the nation and each of the states is doing in providing long-term care services, does not bode well for the nation’s littlest state. It finds the Ocean State ranks 38th nationally on 26 performance indicators, with it achieving the lowest rank of all New England States.

“Our analysis provides a closer look at where Rhode Island is keeping pace and where we fall short,” said AARP State Director Kathleen Connell. “The report indicates that, as the state with the highest percentage of persons 85 and older, we face exceptional challenges. It is our hope that the General Assembly and state policymakers find the analysis to be a valuable tool,” she says.

Failing Grades

The 2014 LTTS Scorecard indicates that Rhode Island:

• Ranks 4th highest among states in nursing home residents per 1,000 persons age 65 and over

• Has a high percent of low-care nursing home residents and spends a far higher percent of its LTSS dollars than the national average on nursing home care as opposed to home and community-based services.

• Has some of the highest long-term care cost burdens in the country making private pay long-term services unaffordable for the vast majority of older households.
But, on a positive note, the state-specific analysis noted that Rhode Island’s best progress was made in the Legal and System Supports dimension largely due to the 2013 passage of the Temporary Caregiver Insurance program and Caregiver Assessment requirements for Medicaid Home and Community Based Services (HCBS).

In addition, to revisiting the 19 recommendations made following the release of AARP’s 2011 Scorecard, the more recent 2014 analysis recommends five new major policy initiates to improve the littlest state’s LTSS. Among the recommendations: funding of an Aging and Disability Resource Center; the developing an online benefits screening tool to allow access to income-assistance benefits and conducting outreach programs to increase participation; reviewing the Rhode Island’s Nurse Practice Act to allow nurse delegation of certain health maintenance and nursing tasks to direct care workers; requiring hospitals to provide education and instruction to family caregivers regarding nursing care needs when a patient is being discharged; and exploring emerging medical technologies to better serve home and community based clients.

The current analysis finds that only four recommendations out of the 2011 recommendations have been implemented, most notably those to promote coordination of primary, acute and long-term care and to strengthen family caregiver supports.

Meanwhile, only six recommendations were partially implemented, including the expansion of the home and community co-pay program and authority (but not implementation) under the 1115 Medicaid waiver renewal to provide expedited eligibility for Medicaid HCBS and for a limited increase in the monthly maintenance allowance for persons on Medicaid HCBS who transition out of nursing homes. Finally, nine recommendations, although still relevant, have not been implemented.

Response and Comments

Responding to the release of AARP’s 2014 Scorecard and state-wide analysis, Governor Gina Raimondo says, “we need to ensure that we have a strong system of nursing home care for those who truly need those services, but we must invest our Medicaid dollars more wisely to support better outcomes. We cannot continue to have the fourth highest costs for nursing home care (as a percent of median income of older households) and also rank near the bottom of all states in investments in home and community-based care.”

According to Raimondo, the state’s Working Group to Reinvent Medicaid is looking closely at AARP’s Scorecard and state-specific analysis and Rhode Island’s spending on nursing home and long-term care. Health & Human Services Secretary Elizabeth Roberts has directed her staff to look directly at the proposals recommended by AARP Rhode Island.

“I expect the Working Group will include specific proposals stemming from these findings in their April budget recommendations and their long-term strategic report they will complete in July,” says the Governor.

AARP Rhode Island Executive Director Connell, representing over 130,000 Rhode Island members, was not at all surprised by the findings of the recently released 2014 Scorecard. “Based on benchmarks set in the 2011 Scorecard, it was apparent that there was much work to do,” she says, recognizing that there are “limited quick fixes.”

“Some steps in the right direction will not lead to an immediate shift in the data. This is a big ship we’re trying to steer on a better course. We were encouraged, however, by ‘improving’ grades for lower home-care costs and the percentage of adults with disabilities ‘usually or always’ getting needed support rising from 64 percent to 73 percent,” adds Connell.

Connell says that the Rhode Island General Assembly is considering legislation to improve the delivery of care, which might just improve the state’s future AARP ‘report’ cards.” “In this session, there is an opportunity to improve long-term supports and services with passage of several bills, including one that would provide population-based funding for senior centers,” she says, stressing that it’s a “responsible investment that will help cities and towns provide better services.”

Connell adds, “The proposed CARE Act gives caregivers better instruction and guidance when patients are discharged and returned to their homes. This can be a cost saver because it can reduce the number of patients returned for treatment or care.”

The larger mission for state leaders is the so-called ‘re-balancing’ of costs from nursing care to home to community-based care. That’s where real savings can occur and home is where most people would prefer to be anyway.”

Finally, Virginia Burke, Executive Director of the Rhode Island Health Care Association, a nursing facility advocacy groups, supports the implementation of the policy initiatives recommended by AARP’s state-specific analysis. But, “The primary driver of our state’s nursing facility use is the extremely advanced age of our elders,” Burke says, noting that the need for nursing facility care is more than triple for those aged 85 and older than for seniors just a decade younger. Due to the state’s demographics you probably won’t see a change of use even if you put more funding into community based home services, she adds.

Governor Gina Raimondo and the General Assembly leadership will most certainly find it challenging to show more improvement by the time the next Scorecard ranks the states. Older Rhode Islanders deserve to have access to a seamless system, taking care of your specific needs. Creative thinking, cutting waste and beefing up programs to keeping people in their homes as long as can happen might just be the first steps to be taken. But, the state must not turn its back on nursing facility care, especially for those who need that level of service.

Herb Weiss, LRI ’12 is a Pawtucket writer who covers aging, health care and medical issues. He can be reached at hweissri@aol.com.