AAIC 2019 Concludes, Researchers Share Findings to Combat Alzheimer’s disease

Published in the Woonsocket Call on July 20, 2019

Thousands of the world’s leading professionals, involved in dementia care and neuroscience research, came at the Los Angeles Convention Center from July 13 to July 18, 2019, to attend the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference® to learn about the findings of the latest Alzheimer’s disease clinical trial and a government-driven public/private initiative to speed them up.

AAIC® is considered to be the largest and most influential international meeting with a mission to advancing dementia research. Every year, AAIC® brings together the world’s leading basic science and clinical researchers, next-generation investigators, clinicians and the care research community, to share research findings that’ll lead to methods of preventing, treating, and improving the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.

“It is clear, and has been for some years that the (Alzheimer’s) field needs to explore other options, and diversify the portfolio of targets. A renewed energy has been brought about by a fivefold increase in Alzheimer’s research funding at the federal level. These gains will propel already-established efforts by the National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer’s Association and others to diversify (therapeutic) targets,” said Maria C. Carrillo, Ph.D., Alzheimer’s Association chief science officer, in a July 17 statement publicizing research findings from the international conference.

Hundreds of Findings of Clinical Trials Shared

According to the Chicago-based Alzheimer’s Association, “a record number of scientific abstracts – more than 3,400 – were submitted to AAIC this year, including 229 abstracts with results from or descriptions of Alzheimer’s clinical trials. AAIC 2019 also spotlighted three clinical trials using innovative methods and targets.”

At AAIC 2019, attendees were updated about the activities of the Accelerating Medicine Partnership-Alzheimer’s Disease (AMP-AD), a partnership among government, industry, and nonprofit organizations (including the Alzheimer’s Association) that focuses on discovering, validating and accelerating new drug targets. The Alzheimer’s Association says that this $225 million research initiative is made possible through the highest-ever levels of U.S. federal funding for research on Alzheimer’s and other dementias, approved and allocated in the last five years.

“This is an example of how the government and private entities and researchers can work together [via AMP-AD funded studies] on providing the resources necessary to expand our abilities to test new drugs and find a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, and, hopefully find a cure,” said Donna M. McGowan, Executive Director of the Alzheimer’s Association, Rhode Island Chapter. “Rhode Island has tremendous researchers, and they are at the forefront of this initiative. they need the tools to increase their scope of work.”

Adds Maria C. Carrillo, Ph.D., Alzheimer’s Association chief science officer, “It is clear, and has been for some years that the field needs to explore other options, other avenues, and diversify the portfolio of targets. A renewed energy has been brought about by a fivefold increase in Alzheimer’s research funding at the federal level, achieved largely due to efforts by the Alzheimer’s Association, the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement, and our ferocious advocates. These gains will propel already-established efforts by the National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer’s Association and others to diversify the portfolio of drug targets for the scientific community.”

The achievements of the AMP-AD Target Discovery Project were highlighted in a series of presentations by the leading AMP-AD investigators at AAIC 2019.

One study noted for the first time, 18-month results from an open-label extension of inhaled insulin in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s including significant benefits for memory ad thinking, day to day functioning, and biological markers of Alzheimer’s.

Another described a newly-initiated 48-week Phase 2/3 clinical trial of a drug targeting toxic proteins released in the brain by the bacterium, P. gingivalis, generally associated with degenerative gum disease. Previous research findings identified the bacterium in brains of more than 90 percent of people with Alzheimer’s across multiple studies and demonstrated that infection may trigger Alzheimer’s pathology in the brain.

Can lifestyle Interventions Promote Brain Health?

There was also an update on the Alzheimer’s Association U.S. Study to Protect Brain health Through Lifestyle Intervention to Reduce Risk (U.S. POINTER) study, now up and running in multiple locations. The U.S. POINTER is a two-year clinical trial to evaluate whether intensive lifestyle interventions that target many risk factors for cognitive decline and dementia can protect cognitive function in older adults at increased risk for cognitive impairment and dementia. Researchers will compare the effects of two lifestyle interventions on brain health in older adults at risk for memory loss in the future. The U.S. POINTER is the first such study to be conducted in a large group of Americans across the United States.

The researchers say people age 60 to 79 will be randomly assigned to one of two lifestyle interventions. Both groups will be encouraged to include more physical and cognitive activity and a healthier diet into their lives and will receive regular monitoring of blood pressure and other health measurements. Participants in one intervention group will design a lifestyle program that best fits their own needs and schedules. Participants in the other intervention group will follow a specific program that includes weekly healthy lifestyle activities.

Laura Baker, Ph.D., associate professor of gerontology and geriatric medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine, and one of the principal investigators of the U.S. POINTER study, said, “Lifestyle interventions focused on combining healthy diet, physical activity and social and intellectual challenges represent a promising therapeutic strategy to protect brain health.”

“U.S. POINTER provides an unprecedented opportunity to test whether intensive lifestyle modification can protect cognitive function in older Americans who are at increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia,” Baker added.

“We envision a future where we can treat and even prevent Alzheimer’s through a combination of brain-healthy lifestyle and targeted medicines, as we do now with heart disease,” Carrillo said. “We hope to prevent millions from dying with Alzheimer’s and reduce the terrible impact this disease has on families.”

For more details about research findings presented at AAIC 2019, http://www.alz.org/aaic

Senate Spending Bill Increases Research Dollars to Combat Alzheimer’s disease

Published in the Woonsocket Call on August 26, 2018

Last Wednesday evening, the US Senate overcame political gridlock by passing a 2019 fiscal “Minibus” spending bill that allocates funding for the Department of Defense; and Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (accounting for 65 percent of all discretionary spending). Within the Health and Human Services appropriation, the National Institutes of Health’s budget increased by $2 billion to $39.1 billion, a 5.4 percent increase over the agency’s current funding level.

The Labor, Health & Human Services, Education and Related Agencies Appropriations bill passed on Augusts 23 by a broad bipartisan vote of 85 to 7, the spending bill combining the Senate Appropriations Committee-passed FY 2019 Labor-HHS spending bill (S. 3158) with the text of the Senate committee-passed Defense spending bill (S. 3159). The Senate-passed appropriations bill, with both Rhode Island Senators supporting, adds an additional $425 million for Alzheimer’s research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for a total of $2.3 billion. The increases in Alzheimer’s funding surpasses the $2 billion research goal of the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease. If signed into law, this would mark the fourth consecutive year of historic action by the U.S. Congress to address the growing Alzheimer’s epidemic through funding research.

As to other NIH health initiatives, the 2019 fiscal spending bill also allocated $429.4 million for the BRAIN initiative to map the human brain, (a $29 million increase), and $376 million for the All of Us precision medicine study, this was $86 million more than in FY 2018.

The Senate Labor, Health and Services, and Education appropriations subcommittee first recommended the Alzheimer’s funding increases in June, with the full Senate appropriations committee later giving its support.

Bipartisan Support for Combating Alzheimer’s Disease

Ahead of the Senate floor vote, U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (Mo.), chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor-HHS, called for increased federal dollars to invest in research to find a prevention and cure for Alzheimer’s disease. “Treating those with Alzheimer’s costs taxpayers $21 million every hour and, without a treatment or cure, will top $1.1 trillion by 2050 – about twice as much as the annual defense budget,” the Senator calculated.

Blunt warned his Senate colleagues that the nation must get serious with confronting the Alzheimer’s epidemic and finding a cure through research. The Senator stated: “Every hour, Alzheimer’s disease costs taxpayers at least $21 million. Every single hour. Someone in the United States is developing Alzheimer’s every 65 seconds,” noting that $277 billion in tax dollars are spent a year on Alzheimer’s and dementia-related care. It’s hard to talk about this without giving numbers, but numbers are not the most riveting thing, particularly when you talk about millions, or billions, or even trillions.

“What does that really mean? That really means that we’re spending basically an amount equal to half of the defense budget on Alzheimer’s and dementia-related care. Just the overwhelming impact of that, if we don’t do something differently than we’re doing right now, just because of the projected long life and demographics of the country, in 2050, which is 32 years from now, we’ll be spending, in today’s dollars, $1.1 trillion on Alzheimer’s and dementia care. $ 1.1 trillion… That’s twice the defense budget of last year, twice the defense budget. …,” says Blunt

“If we could just delay onset of Alzheimer’s, if we could figure out how to come up with something that would slow down the onset of that disease. If we could delay onset by an average of five years, we’d cut that $1.1 trillion by 42 percent, almost in half. If we could have the average person that gets Alzheimer’s, get it five years later than they are getting Alzheimer’s today, almost half, 42 percent of that $1.1 trillion would go away,” said Blunt.

Greater Investment in Alzheimer’s Funding Still Needed

With the Senate appropriations bill pumping more federal dollars into Alzheimer’s research, UsAgainstAlzheimer’s Chairman George Vradenburg issued a statement
saying: “We believe that Alzheimer’s is the second inconvenient truth of the 21st century. Alzheimer’s is the century’s most fearsome — and inevitable — health and social economic threat to the baby boom and future generations, including, in particular, to women and communities of color. Even with this strong commitment from the Senate, greater investment is still needed if we are to deliver meaningful progress in care and treatment to the six million Americans, 50 million globally, living with this disease and their more than 16 million caregivers. In addition to supporting research, we must elevate brain health as an important part of the path to a cure through regular primary care physician assessments of cognitive health — and early and accurate diagnosis of the cause of any cognitive impairment. The Concentrating on High-value Alzheimer’s Needs to Get to an End (CHANGE) Act, comprehensive legislation aimed at overcoming barriers to a faster cure for Alzheimer’s disease, does just that and we urge Congress to pass the CHANGE Act immediately.”

The Chicago-based Alzheimer’s Association and the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement (AIM) also applauded the Senate’s 2019 spending bill that puts more money into Alzheimer’s research. “Every 65 seconds someone in the U.S. develops the disease,” said Harry Johns, Alzheimer’s Association and Alzheimer’s Impact Movement (AIM) President and CEO. “But, thanks to increased NIH funding American scientists are now advancing basic disease knowledge, ways to reduce risk, new biomarkers for early diagnosis and drug targeting, and developing the needed treatments to move to clinical testing,” he says.

The Senate appropriations bill now goes to conference negotiations with the House and must be signed into law by President Donald Trump. The 2019 Fiscal Year begins October. 1.

Splaine Consulting Gears Up to Update State’s Alzheimer’s Plan

Published in Woonsocket Call on July 8, 2018

With the securing of a total of $30,000 in grants, Lt. Governor Dan McKee officially begins Rhode Island’s effort to update its state’s five-year plan on Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders to combat the rapidly increasing incidence of Alzheimer’s disease.

When announcing the successful fundraising effort, McKee noted that Rhode Island has been in the forefront of Alzheimer’s research. “Each day, we make great strides in expanding clinical trials and innovating treatments. Over the last few years alone, the local landscape of prevention and treatment has changed dramatically and positively. The updated State Plan will be an invaluable tool for local leaders, researchers, physicians, advocates and families as we work together to build the momentum in the fight against Alzheimer’s,” he said.

That day, Donna McGowan, Executive Director of the Alzheimer’s Association, Rhode Island Chapter, warned “We face an emerging crisis with the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease projected to increase to as many as 27,000 Rhode Islanders by 2025. Alzheimer’s disease is a pivotal public health issue that Rhode Island’s policymakers cannot ignore. With the rapidly growing and changing extent of the Alzheimer’s crisis, it is essential that Rhode Island’s State Plan becomes a living document that stakeholders regularly consult and re-evaluate. We will continue to work diligently to ensure that the vision of our state’s Alzheimer’s Disease Plan is translated into actual public policy.”

Consultants Bring Content Expertise to Project

With two $15,000 grants provided by the Rhode Island Foundation and Tufts Health Plan Foundation, the Alzheimer’s Association, Rhode Island Chapter, as fiscal agent, released a request for proposal (RFP) for a consultant who would bring writing skills, expertise in public policy initiatives to provide programs and services to persons with Alzheimer’s disease, to the project.

Five consultants responded to the RFP and after a month long-search and a series of interviews, Michael Splaine and Kate Gordon, of Splaine Consulting, a small advocacy and government affairs consulting firm based in Columbia, Maryland, got the contract. No question, Splaine and Gordon brought the right blend of skills to the project. The consultants have provided content matter expertise to over two dozen State Alzheimer’s Plans.

Immediately prior to starting this company eight years ago, Splaine served as Director of State Government Affairs in the Public Policy Division of the Alzheimer’s Association for over 23 years, leading its grassroots network to accomplish state policy priorities, including persuading states to develop comprehensive state Alzheimer Plans in 2007-2008.

While at the Association he was a staff team member for the Association’s Early Stage Initiative (a program working to promote inclusion and programs for persons with Alzheimer’s.) and provided leadership in the Association on the government affairs aspects of the Healthy Brain Initiative, a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, and Prevention continues this work as a consultant to the Association.

Kate Gordon, who has worked with Splaine for over 18 years, has a reputation for being a skilled health policy analyst and grassroots advocacy strategist. She brings expertise in a diverse range of health and long-term care issues topics, including federal and state policies affecting persons with dementia, caregiver interventions, and direct care worker training. Her previous work includes assisting in the development of the first United States National Alzheimer’s Plan and 18 state government Alzheimer’s disease plans.

Gordon was also awarded the prestigious 2013 HHSinnovates People’s Choice and Secretary’s Choice award winner for “Connecting to Combat Alzheimer’s.”

“Kate and I have worked with every level of government from local to global that is taking on the challenge of Alzheimer’s disease, including regionally and globally with the World Health Organization,” explains Splaine. The company’s long listing of clients includes the Alzheimer’s Association in their public health work with Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Alzheimer’s Disease International, the umbrella organization for over 90 national organizations devoted to persons with dementia, and overtime Splaine Consulting has also worked with the national center on elder abuse, Consumer Voice, Arthritis Foundation to name just a few.

The path that led Splaine Consulting to being chosen to update Rhode Island’s Alzheimer’s Plan may seem ironic to some, says Splaine, because it has most certainly brought him back home. He started his early professional life in the Ocean State, graduating Rhode Island College with a gerontology certificate, even having been married to a native Bristol resident for 41 years.

“My earliest work with people with cognitive impairment included volunteer teaching for Fr. (now Msgr.) Gerry Sabourin who was developing what was then called a special religious ed program and my field placement for Rhode Island College at two different adult day care centers,” says Splaine.

“I am thrilled to welcome Splaine Consulting to our team as we relaunch Rhode Island’s coordinated effort to fight Alzheimer’s disease and provide patients with the highest level of support and care,” said McKee. “Rhode Island is a leader in Alzheimer’s research and treatment but knowing how other states are addressing this devastating disease is essential to our success. Splaine’s experience in crafting other State Plans and their thorough understanding of the national landscape make Michael and Kate valuable partners.”

Combatting the Alzheimer’s Epidemic

The update of the State’s initial five-year Alzheimer’s Plan approved by the Rhode Island General Assembly in 2013, is a collaborative effort of the Rhode Island chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, the Division of Elderly Affairs and the Office of the Lt. Governor. The final plan will provide state lawmakers, municipalities and the state’s health care system with a policy strategy to confront the anticipated Alzheimer’s epidemic. It will also take a look at the current impact of Alzheimer’s disease on a growing number of Rhode Islanders and most importantly, details the steps the state must take (legislatively and regulatory) to improve programs and services for people with Alzheimer’s and their family caregivers.

Once the updated report is completed and approved by the Rhode Island General Assembly, the state’s Long-Term Care Coordinating Council’s Executive Board will seek legislative and regulatory changes to carry out its recommendations to ensure that it is more than just a document—that it comes to shape the state’s public policies on Alzheimer’s.

The updated report must be completed by October 31, after which there will be a follow up survey to all stakeholders in the process to see “how we did at capturing their ideas,” says Splaine.

Now, Splaine and Gordon begin their analytical review work of reviewing the existing Alzheimer’s Disease Plan, contacting key state agencies for their input, and planning formal interviews over the next 6 weeks with key persons from care, research, academia, and persons with dementia and family caregivers.

Community input is crucial, says Splaine. “Through the Long-Term Care Coordinating Council’s Executive Board under the leadership of the Lt. Governor, caregiver subcommittee we have a survey out [to solicit comments] that will stay open through the end of August that will be available online and offline, he says. Kicking off on August 5 and concluding August 10, 18 community town meetings are scheduled to allow Rhode Islanders to give their thoughts as to what should be included in the updated State Alzheimer’s Plan.

For a schedule of community town meetings visit, ltgov.ri.gov/alz.